When I think ahead.

When I think ahead, I see that three groups are going to be using some of the same space in the building at approximately the same time. When I think ahead, I let them know.

When Kelley thinks ahead, he knows that high school students often don’t take schedules home to their parents. When he thinks ahead, he figures out how to make them available directly to parents.

When I think ahead, I see that some people think with pictures and some people think with words and some people think with silence. When I think ahead, I prepare pictures and words and silence.

When I think ahead, I remember that when people are tired, they react differently than they do when they are alert, or when they are happy or when they are scared. When I think ahead, I listen so I know how people are doing before I start talking.

When I think ahead, I can be creative because I have time to play with ideas. When I think ahead, I leave time to think ahead.

When I think ahead, I have time to reflect on the images Jude paints of bad leaders in the church:

These men are blemishes at your love feasts, eating with you without the slightest qualm—shepherds who feed only themselves. They are clouds without rain, blown along by the wind; autumn trees, without fruit and uprooted—twice dead. They are wild waves of the sea, foaming up their shame; wandering stars, for whom blackest darkness has been reserved forever.

When I think ahead, I see that there are people who don’t think ahead, who pursue themselves rather than care for others. And I see that it’s okay to use rich images to illustrate the ragged tapestry of pain they are painting with their lives and on others.

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I’ve had some remarkable, honest, responses to my request for how you read the Bible. If you haven’t responded, please read the post and think about it.