Trust. Again.

trustWe got some disappointing news. Not tragic, not devastating, but disappointing. It changed some parts of the future.

The next morning I wrote in my journal, “Trust starts today.”

I realized that trust probably starts again every day. Because every day we are making choices about what we will use to guide our decisions. We can trust others, ourselves, God, processes, no one. What we trust, or who we don’t trust, will shape the next step. And the next.

Late one night, a songwriter captured this feeling. He was in the middle of struggles. There was external resistance and internal anguish. Not a sense of disappointment, but heart-crushing circumstances. In his conversation with God, he says this:

Let the morning bring me word of your unfailing love,
    for I have put my trust in you.
Show me the way I should go,
    for to you I entrust my life. Psalm 143:8

For this person, trust decided where he would wait for an answer, where he would look for guidance. Trust determined that he would not be going to idols or advertisements, polls or prejudice.

The answer we seek may take a long time. But there’s also this: just like a running streak grows by choosing to run each day, trust grows and deepens by being acted on each day.

What does daily trust look like? It’s always short-term risk.

A couple of the disciples would have thought that trusting the bag of half-price candy to bring post-Easter energy seemed more reliable than trusting that the resurrected Jesus would show up when they wanted.

But in the long run, Jesus is more reliable than Reece’s.

So I think trust involves conversation, like the songwriter’s: “I trust you. Please show me you love me. I’ll wait until you do. Because I trust you.”

Advertisements

About Jon Swanson

Social media chaplain. Author of "Lent For Non-Lent People" and "A Great Work: A Conversation With Nehemiah For People (Who Want To Be) Doing Great Works." Writer of 300wordsaday.com. I help people understand. Understand some of the Bible. Understand what Lent can be about. Understand what it means to follow.

One thought on “Trust. Again.

Comments are closed.