What I’m letting go of.

We’ve had a lot of plans change this year. Dreams we’ve let go of. I’m guessing that’s true every year. But because we use the word “unprecedented” for this year, we are more aware of the things that we can’t do, the things that we thought we might do, the things that have stopped.

In the journal today, we’re thinking about the dreams that have died, our own and those of others. But I’m also thinking today about the things we may be choosing to let go of.

Bob Goff says, “It’s a Thursday. You can quit anything on a Thursday.” In Make a List: How a Simple Practice Can Change Our Lives and Open Our Hearts, Marilyn Chandler McEntyre suggesting making a list of the things to let go of. As I’ve written before, Paul talked about forgetting what he had pursued before, and leaning into knowing God.

I started the year with the word “finish”. I’ll talk more about that in a couple weeks. But I think that finishing involves releasing, choosing to let go of a drive to complete and possess.

I’m starting to let go of some of my books. After working hard to accumulate, I’m starting to give away some of these treasures so that other people can use them. And in doing that, I’m letting go of the belief that my value is measured by the books I have (even if I don’t use them, or read them).

I’m starting to release dreams of what I could or should accomplish, given that the number of years I have to do them is shrinking during my indecision. (For example, do I worry about writing that one big scholarly book or do I focus on being practically helpful?)

I’m letting go of one of my consulting roles at the end of the year, knowing that as amazing as it is, I need to close some of my emotional browser windows to be able to focus on the ones that are left (including doing nothing at some points.)

I understand that in releasing there is loss. And it’s okay to have some grief around that loss. But I’m also pretty sure that in the space we make by letting go of some things, we can hear God, especially if he’s speaking quietly.

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.