Not afraid to depend on God.

(This week I’m running a series of posts from the past talking about making choices to learn. This one was first published April 9, 2013)

A friend wrote me an email about a teaching project she’s working on.  “A number of times,” she said, “you have written about ‘who do you want to be’ vs. ‘what do you want to do’. And the more planning I put into this, the more I want this to be the core of what we begin with.”

A couple months ago I wrote “How do you want to be when you grow up?” I asked “What do you want to be true of you as a leader in five years?” And I followed it with “Making an intentional change that will help in five years.”

Here’s what living that out might look like.

Say that one of the things that I want to be true of myself is, “I want to be a person that isn’t afraid to depend on God. “

To learn to become that kind of person, I would have to look at people who weren’t afraid to depend on God. I can find five pretty quickly. There are more.

  • In Joshua 24, Joshua gathers the leaders of Israel and in a last lecture reviews their shared history and says “choose which god you want to serve. But me? I’ll serve God to the end.”
  • Joshua’s mentor, Moses, had made the same kind of speech (we read it in Deuteronomy).
  • Mary starts her work with a statement of trust in God.
  • Paul says the same kind of things to Timothy (2 Timothy 4) and
  • Jesus says that he’s done what God asked him to do, nothing more and nothing less (John 12:44-50, for example.)

Then I would study the lives of those people, looking for the points at which they stated, and acted on, their dependence. I would look for the influences on their lives. I would look for patterns.

And then I would start living out their pattern.

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